30 Day Perennial Post Challenge | Day 21 | Perovskia atriplicifolia

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More On Fall Planting

September is the time we start to remove spent tomato plants, white fly riddled squash and spindly green beans from the garden, but some gardeners are just getting ready for their most productive growing season: fall. The weather of fall offers a second chance at growing cool-weather vegetables commonly planted in early spring. In addition, the cooler weather decreases water requirements and the pressures of garden pests.
 
Plant broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage transplants in late summer/early fall while the days are still warm. Apply fertilizer at planting and again two weeks later to get substantial growth before temperatures cool and water regularly.  Leafy greens like lettuce, chard and spinach are best planted in late September to mid October.   For many vegetables such as kales and broccoli when the nights get cool the flavor is better, and a light frost makes vegetables taste sweeter and makes for more intense colors.
 
Plant seeds of carrots and beets in succession plantings to get multiple harvests. Root crops such as carrots and beets need deep loose soil. Seeds must be planted ½-inch deep and space to 2 inches when sprouts are 2 to 3 inches high. These vegetables are best harvested when tender and young to use fresh preparation. Water is most important while seeds are germinating. Be sure to harvest some of the beet tops to eat as fresh or prepared greens.
 
Plant lettuce, arugula, spinach and cilantro seed to use in fresh salads. Leafy greens can be started in pots or in squared sections of your garden by broadcasting seeds. Starting in just a few weeks, you can harvest micro-greens to add on top of a decadent dish or in four weeks make a freshly grown salad. These crops can also be planted in succession plantings to get multiple harvests.
 

We have plenty of fall and winter vegetables available now at Morningsun.   For a complete list, see out online catalog >> Fall &  Winter Vegetables 2016

Fall Planting for Permanence

Fall is the best time to plant hardy perennials, with many benefits over spring planting.   Plants set out during the fall do not have to deal with summer’s peak heat, yet still benefit from warm soil temperatures and the probability of deep soaking winter rains. One of the greatest benefits of fall planting is the opportunity for plants to develop a deep, extensive root system before the arrival of summer.   Days are shorter and cooler, and plants transpire far less.   Soils remain warm during the fall, encouraging rapid root growth, and the plants have less tendency to wilt.   Plants can be watered less often, aiding in the development of a deep rooted plant that can withstand heat stress.
Many perennials can be planted almost year round successfully.   With care, evergreen perennials such as rosemary, sage, lavenders and penstemon can be planted even in the winter.   Herbaceous perennials, those that die back to the ground in the winter, should be planted by mid October.   This includes lemon verbena, ornamental sages, coneflowers, brown eyed susans and catmint.   Plant scented geraniums in the ground by early October, unless you plan to bring them inside for use as houseplants.   This will assure they will grow an adequate root system before they go dormant.
A final note about fall planting.   Often plants purchased in the fall are root bound. Gently pull plants from their containers and check for vigor.   Roots should not be discolored, mushy, slimy, or smell odd.   A root bound plant with healthy white roots can be pruned by making 2 cuts opposite each other about 1/2 inch deep the height of the root ball.   Gently tease the roots apart before planting.

30 Day Perennial Post Challenge | Day 20 | Gaura ‘Rosy Jane’

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30 Day Perennial Post Challenge | Day 18 | Gypsophila paniculata ‘Festival Star’

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30 Day Perennial Post Challenge | Day 17 | Verbena lilacina ‘De La Mina’

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30 Day Perennial Post Challenge | Day 16 | Euphorbia characias ‘Glacier Blue’

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30 Day Perennial Post Challenge | Day 15 | Fall Vegetables

30 Day Perennial Post Challenge | Day 14 | Phlomis lanata

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